Performance & Audition Strategies

Preparation, Mind over Matter, Self-Talk, Adversity Training, Buddy-Up, Ego-Free Zone, Physical Health, Cleansing Breathing, and Positive Affirmations are all strategies to improve your playing skills. Read through the helpful performance & audition strategies below for more details.

Performance & Audition Strategies Page Two

Exercise Based on “Tchaikovsky 6”

This is a technical exercise for bassoon that emphasizes the lower register.

It’s a really great exercise to develop 2nd bassoon playing in an orchestra. There is a lot of left thumb work and this pattern can go all the way up to the highest register as well. You are executing this pattern using all of the keys.

The order of notes can also be shuffled around within a small intervalic space similar to the Hanon Piano exercises (a wonderful resource for developing technique). Simon Kovar’s Bassoon book is also an excellent resource.

Download the exercise here

“The Split” in the three registers of the bassoon

This is a standard warm up for a lot of instruments. I’ve found it really helps build awareness of air flow as intervals increase and expand ascending and descending.

This is a good warm up for legato and sound production and how to negotiate the spin of the air stream.

This piece can also be played along with a drone and also on any starting note.

My Favorite Scale Warmup

This warmup I started on when I was 11 years old and I use it every morning. This is how I start warming up! The reason why I use this is that it condenses all of the scales within a short period of time while shifting chromatically one octave at a time allowing me to work on fluidity and changing keys rapidly.

This warmup I started on when I was 11 years old and I use it every morning. This is how I start warming up! The reason why I use this is because it condenses all of the scales within a short period of time while shiftly chromatically one octave at a time allowing me to work on fluidity and changing keys rapidly.

The document is in major scales but this can also be even more challenging by alternating between major and minor. This allows the musician an opportunity to not only work on the mechanics of playing the instrument but it also gives you a mental challenge so you are never playing “by rote” (playing without thinking). If you know your scales, this is no problem.

There are different levels you can take this exercise to. I like to apply this to my students depending on their level of study. We often do this in group sessions in a circle. Every student of mine will play alternating scales and we keep a circle going. It’s actually very fun!